Baiting

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338 hunting trips from 126 outfitters starting from $250

338 hunts
$250 starting from
136 animals
466km to the nearest trip

About Baiting

Different situations require different actions. Sometimes terrain, thick vegetation or even the elusiveness of your prey dictate using alternative methods to the default way of spot and stalk. If you can't approach the animal, you can lure the animal to come to you. Baiting is one of the ways to do it - place some attractant where you want the animal to come to, and wait for it to appear. Sounds simple, but, like many other apparently simple hunting schemes, it has its share of complications and dire straights. Read more...

Waiting for your quarry to come to you is an ancient tradition that comes in many forms and shapes. Baiting is distinguished by the fact that the food that you attract the animal with is laid deliberately. However, the line between artificial bait and a natural food source is very thin. A prime example of this is bear hunting over oat fields in Russia. Some of these fields belong to local farmers, who expect to make a profit out of the oats. Others are planted by outfitters solely as attraction for bears and wild pigs, and aren't even meant to be reaped. From your tree stand, you'll never know the difference. As long as it’s legal, any food that is attractive to a particular animal can be used as bait, and numerous ways of placing it are possible. Bear treats, for example, include expired human foodstuffs such as hot dogs and confectionary. In some places, e.g. hunting sitatunga in a number of African countries, food sources are created by burning patches of the jungle. Fresh grass that grows over the burns attracts the animals. Baiting is perhaps the most common method of taking the big cats in Africa. This hunt is usually integrated into the general scheme of the safari, when the client first hunts the herbivores, and then the meat of these animals is used as bait for a lion or a leopard. Normally, the PH and the crew set up a number of baits, in the places where a huntable animal was seen, or its tracks found. Then the team may spend day after day driving from bait to bait, until it discovers that one of them has been discovered by a legal trophy. This is determined by reading tracks and other signs left by the animal, or watching images from trail cameras placed at the bait. When the answer is positive, a ground blind or a tree stand is constructed, and the hunter with the PH stay to wait for the animal. This hunt may prove not as tame as it seems, especially when hunting from a ground blind. When meat is the attraction, the predator may find the lure of fresh meat of the humans more attractive than old one on the bait, and hunt the hunters. Predators who consider the bait their property are naturally defensive, and the approach to the blind can become an unpleasant surprise. Where and how to lay the bait is the guide's responsibility, and the hunter seldom has a say in the matter. Positioning the baits is a problem with many variables. The place where the bait is laid should be not only lie where the animal has a good chance of finding it, it must be convenient for the hunter positioning the animal in a good shooting position when feeding, but also be convincing and give the appearance of safety for the animal. To achieve this, guides occasionally resort to “advertising” - for example, dragging a piece of bait behind the truck for a long distance, leaving a scent trail to the main course. Still, on many occasions a hunter has to wait for days before the desired trophy discovers and begins feeding on the bait at the right time or during legal shooting hours. Once the animal finds the bait, a different problem often occurs: how to keep it there long enough. When a predator finds an attractive meal in the open, it instinctively tries to drag it into an enclosed spot, to hide and/or consume without being disturbed. This, of course, works against the main purpose of the hunt, and creates the need to invent something to force the animals to eat the treat on the spot. Black bear hunters in the USA, for instance, place the bait in metal drums and tie them to trees. African PHs hang pieces of meat as bait for the big cats just high enough in the trees to catch their interest and give them a taste but yet not let them gorge themselves and get full and also out of reach of other scavengers who would deplete the bait. The biggest challenge with hunting over bait is that in 9 cases out of 10, the animal comes to the bait at dusk or dawn, in twilight, or even in the dead of the night. Even with modern optics, shooting when there's not enough light can be a challenge. Technology can help, but different nations and regions have different regulations regarding legal shooting hours, use of night vision sights and artificial light. It's better to check out the rules in advance, to know where you stand. In other respects, hunting over a bait differs little from other cases of hunting from a blind or a high seat. You should be as careful, silent and motionless in this instance as in other instances when you wait for the animal to come to you. The main advantages are equally similar. Additional food source attracts not only the intended quarry, and you can become a witness to the most intimate scenes from the life of nature. One hunter, while waiting for a Himalayan bear in the Primorie region of Russia, had a fortunate if not disturbing experience when a Siberian tiger with cubs came to the bait. Baiting is usually the means of last resort, used when nothing else is possible. But that doesn’t mean it’s not an exciting pursuit, and it usually makes for very intimate encounters with nature. Discover your baiting options on BookYourHunt. Hide details

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Wolf Hunt 1x1

Wolf Hunt 1x1 Canada

The Grey Wolf, also known as Timberwolf, is the largest wild member of the Canidae Family. The coloration of Wolves varies greatly from snow white to coal black and all the intermediate degrees of cream, grey, and brown. A large male Wolf may measure over 2 m in length and stand almost 1 m high at his shoulders. Their weight can vary from 28 – 80 kg. The largest Wolves are found in Northwestern Canada. Grey Wolves are highly adaptable and have thrived in temperate forest, deserts, mountains, tundra, taiga, and grassland. They have good hearing, a sharp eyesight, and a well developed sense of smell. Timberwolves can be harvested in combination with any of our big game fall hunts. For a true wolf hunting experience book one of our winter wolf hunts where snowmobiles and predator calling techniques will be utilized. We encourage all Hunters to secure a Wolf tag, since there is always the possibility of taking a very nice Trophy.

Trip duration: 5 days

Hunting season: 1 December 2019 15 February 2020

$5,000 for 1 hunter
Spring Baited Black Bear Hunt '20

Spring Baited Black Bear Hunt '20 Canada

Our guides will either pick you up at the Winnipeg Airport or meet you in the town of St. Laurent or Teulon. We will then embark on a five-day black bear hunting trip in Manitoba's pristine Interlake. You will choose whether you prefer the outpost camp experience, with BBQ and campfire cooked meals, or the hotel experience, where you will sleep in the comfort of one our recommended hotels and eat in local restaurants (at your own expense). Hunts will be done out of a two-person treestand with one person per stand for added space and comfort. Hunters will be driven into bait sites by ATV or truck. For really remote locations some walking may be required in order to get to bait site. Hunters can use a bow, muzzleloader or rifle. You will arrive one day before your first hunt day and depart the day after your last hunt day. Our guides are professional, hard working and will do everything they can to put you on big Interlake bears.

Trip duration: 5 days

Hunting season: 30 April 2020 17 June 2020

$2,400 for 1 hunter
2020 Spring Black Bear Hunt

2020 Spring Black Bear Hunt Canada

Welcome. We are located in the heart of Beautiful New Brunswick, Canada. Our number one priority is to make our establishment your ultimate Black Bear hunting destination. Our Canadian wilderness has so many spectacular sights to see, whether it be a small trickling brook, waterfall, or lake, and of course, some of the best black bear hunting in North America, you will not be disappointed in all New Brunswick has to offer. Our staff is friendly, and will go to great lengths to make your experience unforgettable. We maintain approximately 30 bait sites, and many of our stands are set up at bow range. We also have ground blinds and rifle stand sites, and can accommodate any type of hunter. Hunting method options are: rifle, compound, long or cross bow, muzzleloader or shotgun with a slug. We are located in the top county for success with our past hunters having an 85% success rate and 100% sightings. The average adult black bear weighs anywhere from 250-600 pounds. With the purchase of a bear license, you can also hunt coyote (no limit) and the best small mouth bass fishing is available at no extra charge. 16 and 17 year old hunters are eligible to purchase a non-resident bear license if they show proof of a Firearm Safety/Hunter Education and proof of two year’s hunting experience if hunting with a gun, or a stand alone Bow Hunter Education course or a previous bow hunting license if hunting with a bow or crossbow. 16 and 17 year olds must be accompanied by an adult holder of a bear license with two years hunting experience. We have a limit of 8 hunters per week and only hunt the best 4 weeks of the spring season to ensure a quality experience. We offer a discount of $100 USD per person if there is a group of 4 or more hunters booking together.

Trip duration: 5 days

Hunting season: 21 May 2020 11 June 2020

$2,495 for 1 hunter
Baiting

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Aleksei Agafonov Founder, Europe +43 (660) 380 28 95
Jennifer Jenkins Support, North America +1 (307) 752 7886